Posts Tagged ‘large dogs’

Bee Safe! How to Prevent and Treat Bee Stings

Friday, June 8th, 2018

Bee safe! Dogs are famous for being curious and playful, which are two of the reasons we love them so much! However, these personality traits don’t mix well with bees and other poisonous insects. To a dog, what could be more fun than scampering after a low-flying bee? Unfortunately, our best friends have no clue that what they’re chasing has a stinger on its rear end that could give them a world of hurt!

A Pound of Prevention

Before you and your dog go out and play in the back yard or park, take a quick look around for hives and bee attractants. Many bees build underground nests, so scan for hives at ground level as well as in trees. Should you discover a hive, leave it to the professionals and don’t attempt to move or destroy it yourself.

Traps are a great option for nuisance bees such as Yellowjackets and Wasps: the non-toxic pheromones only attract those varieties and not our beneficial Honeybee friends.  Placing a few of these  near high traffic areas can make a big difference.  Bees are of course attracted to flowers, so it’s a good idea to check for any activity in your garden before your four-legged friends go outside to smell the roses.

Food…who doesn’t love it? If you have your dog with you at a BBQ or picnic, burning a Citronella candle can help keep bees away (along with pesky mosquitoes!). Citronella isn’t harmful to bees, but they will avoid areas infused with its smell.

How to Treat a Bee Sting

If you notice your pooch has met the wrong end of the bee, keep a careful watch for an allergic reaction. Just like humans, some dogs are severely allergic to the venom. Symptoms to look for: difficulty and/or rapid breathing, weakness, vomiting, pale gums, diarrhea, and a large amount of swelling that extends away from the sting site. Contact an emergency vet immediately should you see any signs of an allergic reaction. If your dog is not allergic to bees, but is stung multiple times, you should also consult your vet immediately, as reactions can be more dangerous than a single sting.

Try to remove the stinger if possible; it will make your best friend more comfortable and decrease the likelihood of infection. You can treat the area with a mixture of water and baking soda, and by wrapping an ice pack with a towel and applying to the site to reduce swelling. Benadryl is a safe and effective antihistamine for bee stings.  Proper dosing for dogs is 1 mg per pound. Most Benadryl comes in 25 mg tablets, which is easier to dose for larger dogs but for small dogs, try children’s Benadryl in a 12.5 mg dose (the liquid option makes it easy!).

What happens if your dog swallows a bee? Trapped in your dog’s mouth, a bee will sting anywhere. If your dog has tried to swallow it, the stinger may be at the very back of the tongue or even down the esophagus. This can be a very dangerous situation as swelling could occur and block their airway.

Long story short, keep your vet’s number handy along with Benadryl, and keep a close eye on free range pups during these warmer summer months!  Bee safe out there!

Go For Ride?!?! Dog-friendly vehicles and supplies

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

If you’re a dog, there is nothing better than sticking your head out the window of a car while on a road trip or just a short jaunt. The beautiful smells and the excitement of going somewhere new (or to your favorite dog park!) can be one of the happiest activities for your pet. Dogs love going for a ride and you might as well make the experience enjoyable for everyone involved. Here are some pet friendly features you should look for when purchasing a new or used vehicle, or outfitting your current car.

go for ride

Easy access – a hatchback or back door that lifts up so the dog can jump in and out with ease. It also makes things easier for you and your back when lifting a crate in and out of the vehicle! Seats that fold flat are also a good idea because it keeps the seats themselves from getting too dirty. Subaru and Volvo, along with other auto companies offer pet-friendly designs and packages to help keep Fido happy, and lastly affordable seat covers to help keep your car more dog-friendly and less pig sty are never a bad idea.

When traveling with a pooch it can be convenient to have a large cargo area to accommodate dogs and supplies, such as spare tires, water/food, leashes, etc. If you’re an owner who doesn’t want your dog in the front seat, looking for a car that comes with a ‘pet barrier’ is ideal or purchase a cargo divider afterwards. Large dogs can be difficult to lift in and out of cars, and you don’t want to hurt your back so a lower to the ground profile will make it easier for dogs of all sizes and ages to climb in and out on their own.

Windows, great for rolling down, less great to clean dog slobber off of! However, keeping them rolled down on warm days (remember if it’s over 75 degrees it’s best to leave Fido at home) to provide ventilation and fresh air is must. Another nice option are rear A/C vents or air vents on the seat itself so your doggy can benefit from the cool air on a hot day. Most dog owners know carpet is pretty much a dog hair magnet. Paying a little extra for rubber mats makes a huge difference as does selecting a vehicle with an easy-to-clean interior. If your pooch is smarter than the average bear or has magically grown opposable thumbs, childproof locks are one of the most important safety features as they can help prevent the dog from accidentally opening or closing the window or door.

Dogs_Die_In_Hot_Cars_Poster_2015_-_JULY

No matter what vehicle you and your pooch are riding in you want to be able to trust that your dog is safe. Some guardians use a padded harness that secures the dog to the seat, however recent studies have shown that they may not be safe as previously thought. One of the safest options is a secured, crash-tested crate in the previously discussed cargo area. Whatever option you choose, the most important objective is to keep your dog safe at all times and that also means not driving with your dog on your lap. Yep, we said it. Please don’t. It’s unsafe for you, your pup and everyone else on the road.

Here at Dog-ON-It-Parks, we’re all dog lovers and seeing a dog happily riding in a car with its tongue rolled over to the side, nose twitching, smelling everything the world has to offer is the best thing ever! Make that ride as comfortable and as safe as possible with a pet friendly vehicle – your dog will love you for it!

fullcheeks


Made in the USA
Cooperative Purchasing
Member of NRPA, WRPA, WMFHA, NAA, AAMD, TAA, FAA & AMA
Click here to access Dog-ON-It-Parks’ design files including cad drawings, specifications, videos and related documents. The CADdetails program is developed specifically for design professionals with the goal of getting manufacturer-specific product information into their working plans.
© 2008-2018 Dog-ON-It-Parks. All Rights Reserved.

Cirkuit: Best Ecommerce Platform