Posts Tagged ‘pet safety’

Bee Safe! How to Prevent and Treat Bee Stings

Friday, June 8th, 2018

Bee safe! Dogs are famous for being curious and playful, which are two of the reasons we love them so much! However, these personality traits don’t mix well with bees and other poisonous insects. To a dog, what could be more fun than scampering after a low-flying bee? Unfortunately, our best friends have no clue that what they’re chasing has a stinger on its rear end that could give them a world of hurt!

A Pound of Prevention

Before you and your dog go out and play in the back yard or park, take a quick look around for hives and bee attractants. Many bees build underground nests, so scan for hives at ground level as well as in trees. Should you discover a hive, leave it to the professionals and don’t attempt to move or destroy it yourself.

Traps are a great option for nuisance bees such as Yellowjackets and Wasps: the non-toxic pheromones only attract those varieties and not our beneficial Honeybee friends.  Placing a few of these  near high traffic areas can make a big difference.  Bees are of course attracted to flowers, so it’s a good idea to check for any activity in your garden before your four-legged friends go outside to smell the roses.

Food…who doesn’t love it? If you have your dog with you at a BBQ or picnic, burning a Citronella candle can help keep bees away (along with pesky mosquitoes!). Citronella isn’t harmful to bees, but they will avoid areas infused with its smell.

How to Treat a Bee Sting

If you notice your pooch has met the wrong end of the bee, keep a careful watch for an allergic reaction. Just like humans, some dogs are severely allergic to the venom. Symptoms to look for: difficulty and/or rapid breathing, weakness, vomiting, pale gums, diarrhea, and a large amount of swelling that extends away from the sting site. Contact an emergency vet immediately should you see any signs of an allergic reaction. If your dog is not allergic to bees, but is stung multiple times, you should also consult your vet immediately, as reactions can be more dangerous than a single sting.

Try to remove the stinger if possible; it will make your best friend more comfortable and decrease the likelihood of infection. You can treat the area with a mixture of water and baking soda, and by wrapping an ice pack with a towel and applying to the site to reduce swelling. Benadryl is a safe and effective antihistamine for bee stings.  Proper dosing for dogs is 1 mg per pound. Most Benadryl comes in 25 mg tablets, which is easier to dose for larger dogs but for small dogs, try children’s Benadryl in a 12.5 mg dose (the liquid option makes it easy!).

What happens if your dog swallows a bee? Trapped in your dog’s mouth, a bee will sting anywhere. If your dog has tried to swallow it, the stinger may be at the very back of the tongue or even down the esophagus. This can be a very dangerous situation as swelling could occur and block their airway.

Long story short, keep your vet’s number handy along with Benadryl, and keep a close eye on free range pups during these warmer summer months!  Bee safe out there!

Making Pet Travel Pawesome!

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

Making Pet Travel Pawesome: Pet travel has gone to the dogs and pet parents couldn’t be happier!  Between working service animals on flights and more families including their 4-legged friends on vacations, dogs are travelling at record rates. Travelers with service animals and pets know that the potty problem used to mean added airport stress; where will your dog relieve himself when in a time crunch to make your flight? Thankfully airports now provide terminals with accessible animal relief areas which cater to the jet setting pooch. Dog-On-It-Parks is proud to lead the pack with design services and products that make travel more comfortable for dogs and their owners. Two airports that we’ve outfitted (San Diego and Atlanta) were featured in the list of American Kennel Club’s Top 10 Most Dog Friendly Airports. We love making air travel easier for service animals and pets alike, and with just a few key items, any airport can provide a “pawsh” relief area for dogs.

The Grass is Greener:  One of the most important elements in a pet relief area is quality surfacing. One popular option is our PetGrass Pods; their short, dense blades allow for easy waste removal and the antimicrobial agents built into both the yarn and backing help to prevent odors. Available in standard in 50″ x 40″ squares or custom sizes, they snug together for easy installation and maintenance and typically cost less than a standard roll-style turf installation. Pods are a wonderful choice for high traffic areas, as they can easily be swapped around to manage wear and lifted to clean underneath.  The addition of a Fire Hydrant is a fun touch, and provides a place for dogs to get an update on each other’s jet setting adventures.  And don’t let your pooch become parched! Providing hydration for dogs is very important, as they are more likely to become dehydrated while traveling. Our Pedestal Bottle Filler with Pet Bowl features a handy eco-friendly bottle filler as well as a pet bowl, so you don’t have to shell out top dollar for airport bottled water.

Shopping and Adventuring in Style: Dogs aren’t only living the high life at airports. Many more public spaces such as malls, restaurants and retail establishments are welcoming our furry friends and proving pet-friendly areas for play, hydration, and relief. With a treat canister, built in waste bag dispenser and water bubblers galore, our Dream Fountain is a hit among pups everywhere and will keep customers coming back again and again.  Lastly, adding a few select pieces of agility equipment will also help ensure that your public space is the place for dogs to see and be seen, all while having a barking good time.

Home for the Howlidays: Survival tips, treat recipes and more

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

There’s no place like home for the howlidays…until it gets crazy, that is.  If you’re like us, one of your favorite things to do this time of year is throw on some warm PJ’s, settle in with a good book or movie, and pretend like your shopping expedition to the mall never happened.  If we get stressed, it’s no surprise that the holiday season is stressful for our pets too.  From a house full of guests, new and potentially unhealthy foods to be tempted by, and generally being a little off their game, here are some tips on keeping Fido calm and collected this Christmas.

Crate Training 

A dog’s crate can be its best friend and a much needed safe haven from all the hustle and bustle.  Crate training is actually quite easy if broken down into easy to manage steps (and be sure to use lots of positive reinforcement and treats!).  Unlike the crates of yesteryear, there are some cool ways you can incorporate these pet-friendly spaces into your home without it screaming “crazy dog person”.  The Humane Society of the United States has some helpful tips on training here, but this is the gist:

  • Keep the training short and sweet to start off.  Lure Fido in by dropping some high value treats inside, give them tons of praise if he goes in and allow him to come right back out.  We shouldn’t have to say this, but we will: People, do not force your dog into the crate, use it as punishment or leave them in there all day.
  • Transition to feeding meals in the crate and close the door while they eat.
  • Gradually increase the time spent in their crate and continue to give praise and biscuits.  The crate is a happy place, right?

If you notice your dog getting stressed, check out some of the most common signs here, make sure their crate is in a quiet location and tuck them in.  Caveat: Some dogs don’t like crates.  At all.  A bathroom, bedroom or some other confined, secure space can make a huge difference though.  Make sure they have a cozy bed to curl up in, and some classical music can help too – there are even dog specific soundtracks on Spotify you can play.

Walking in a Winter Wonderland 

Daily exercise – good for us and good for our pets.  Studies show that having a pet helps to lower blood pressure, manage anxiety and depression, and when you add walking or running into the equation, it’s a win-win! According to PetMD, most dogs should get 30 minutes to 2 hours of exercise each day.  This of course varies by breed, age, health concerns, etc and can be anything from chasing a ball, nosework, playing with a flirt pole (our Great Dane LOVES this), or an indoor game of hide & seek – you’re looking to get the heart rate up a bit and also some mental stimulation.

For regions that see snow and ice, please keep in mind that it’s really important to protect those sweet feet.  Grooming the fur in and around the pads will help prevent ice from forming which can lead to chapping and even cracking.  You can make or purchase paw balm to prevent and heal those cracks, or go all out and buy a snazzy pair of booties.

We love the Freedom No-Pull Harness for our office dogs; it has the traditional loop on the back and also one on the front which is helpful when walking a dog who would prefer to be dragging you.  The additional pressure (safely distributed) across the front of the chest slows them down significantly.  It also features a velvety soft lining on the inside to help prevent chafing on their delicate undercarriages.

Scooby Snacks 

‘Tis the season for counter surfing! Unfortunately, this is a busy time of year at emergency vet clinics.  Pancreatitis from overindulging, choking from a bone, eating poisonous plants or chocolate – the holidays can be downright dangerous.

You can help keep your pet satiated with some healthy, easy-to-make treats and dog food toppers.  Here are a few favorites:

Peanut Butter Banana Ice Cream (you could eat it too!)

Slow Cooker Dog Food

Bacon & Peanut Butter Glazed Biscuits 

Turmeric & Fish Treats 

And some breath fresheners after indulging in those fish treats…Frosty Breath Dog Treats

 

Here’s to a healthy, happy, stress-free (or at least manageable) holiday season! Woof woof! 

 

Time to Be Positive: Dog Training Tips & Tricks

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

Pawsitive Reinforcement:

When it comes to dog training, there are many options and opinions as to the best method, however we believe that positivity breeds more positivity! Positive-reinforcement training techniques use non-confrontational methods to engage your dog’s brain. This is done by rewarding positive behavior, and establishing rituals and training actions that are incompatible with negative behavior. Essentially, you reward the positive and either ignore the negative, or direct them to a behavior you do want.  Easy, right?  Doing this can help to lessen your dog’s frustration with the learning process, while still allowing the dog to feel good. There should be no forceful actions as this can damage your pup’s trust. Think about you it…how fast would you sit down for a cookie, some praise or a nice pat on the back? To a dog, those actions are not only treasured but an important part of their lives. Here are some tips on how to incorporate positivity in your dog’s training.

Treat Generously: 

First of all, when using positive reinforcement timing is key; the reward must be given within seconds or your pet might not connect the dots.  An example is when you give your dog a treat for sitting down at your command. You don’t give them the cookie after they’ve sat back up and their attention is on something else, you reward them when all of their attention is focused on you and what they are doing. There are several types of positive reinforcement, it can encompass treats, praise, petting, or even a favorite game. Although most dogs (including our office crew!) are highly food-motivated, and this type of reinforcement can often yield the best results.

Sit. Stay. Play: 

You also want to pay attention to the type of commands you are using with your pet. Keep them short! Use simple one-word commands which are easier for your dog to understand. Some examples are: Come, Sit, Stay, Down, Heel, Off, etc… You might also want to inform your family or those you live with of these to help avoid confusion for your dog later – consistency is key! Your training sessions should also be short and fun, and the goal is to have your dog associate good things while training.

More How To’s:

As time goes on and your pet becomes more skilled (and hopefully better behaved!), it is a good idea to gradually back off the treats and use them only on occasion. Eventually, the treats should no longer be necessary, however you should always reward Fido with verbal praise and a pet. It is important that you continue to use these techniques to maintain the behaviors you want from your dog.

Reward-based dog training helps create a range of desirable behaviors, which builds mutual feelings of trust and confidence, and a bond that will last for years to come. If you’d like more info on positive reinforcement and dog training, we highly recommend Victoria Stilwell’s website.  It’s a wonderful resource for all things dog. Good luck and woof woof!

Hound Heroes: Strays Who Saved the Day

Friday, May 13th, 2016

Hero Dogs

We all know dogs are loyal companions, they perform acts of selflessness, courage and even stray dogs can have a sense of duty and protection. Here are several stories of hound heroes who not only saved the day, but saved lives. Dogs truly are man’s best friend!

Firefighting dog

 “Firefighting Fido”

In 1935, a stray dog came to the rescue of a family whose house had caught on fire in San Mateo, California. The family was unaware of the fire and had it not been for the dog barking and alerting them to get out of the house, they might have perished. Dogs have an incredibly strong sense of smell and can detect smells much better than people. Whereas humans use sight as their strongest sense, for canines it’s their nose and they use them for everything, from wet nose wake up calls in the morning and saving strangers from house fires!

nanny

“Nanny Dog”

In 2005, near the Ngong Forests in Nairobi, Kenya a caring canine came across an abandoned newborn baby. The child was wrapped in tattered clothes and a plastic bag. The dog carried the child across a busy road, through barbed wire and into a shed where she was keeping her puppies. A man who owned the shed discovered the baby and alerted the local authorities. A dog’s maternal instincts are something to be admired. They are loyal, loving, caring, and protective creatures.  Did you know Pit Bulls used to be referred to as Nanny Dogs? They earned this nickname in the 1900’s and were considered to be the strongest, most protective, loyal, and loving animals towards children.

aussie

“Aussie Hero”

During 2009, in Maningrida Australia, a stray dog intervened in a domestic fight.  A man had beat his partner in front of family members, and then dragged her outside where our Aussie Hero Dog came to the rescue.  The dog stopped the violent assault by biting the attacker and saved the woman from further harm so authorities were able to capture him. Dogs have been protective of their owners since the beginning of time, but what provokes a dog into helping a stranger? Studies have shown dogs have a sixth sense about people’s intentions. One breed that is particularly protective is the German Shepherd who are characterized as dogs who listen well, learn quickly and are obedient – all of these characteristics are also why these heroic dogs are used so often by police departments and the military. They’re also pretty cute! sheps

So the next time you see a stray dog, remember these stories of our hound heroes! Help prevent animal abuse by helping a dog in need.  If you come across a dog who may be lost, check Fido for any tags with guardian information.  If he doesn’t have one, please take him to a local vet clinic or humane society where they can scan for a microchip and provide a safe haven. They would do the same for you!

Pet Health: National Poison Prevention Week

Friday, March 11th, 2016

Protect your pets! There are many foods that can hinder your dog’s health and Dr. Justine Lee has some wonderful insights and much needed information for all pet owners. Dr. Lee is a world-renown veterinary speaker, DVM, DACVECC, DABT and a double board-certified emergency critical care specialist and toxicologist. She’s also the CEO and founder of VETgirl, which is a subscription-based podcast and webinar service offering RACE approved continuing education.

'Whoa! Slow down, kids! Your mom will neuter me if I bring you home with stomachaches from eating too much of that junk.'

According to this expert some of the most ten commonly talked about poisonous foods for dogs are actually more of a question mark. Avocado, for example, isn’t poisonous at all. While fertilizer might have scary looking names on the list of ingredients, most of the contents are natural and harmless. Garlic is another food that pet owners don’t need to worry about. An average-sized dog would need to eat a lot of garlic before they showed any signs of sickness, but talk about bad breath! What are you going to do when your animal comes up to you with garlic breath? Give your furry friend a “doggy” breath mint.

On the other hand, there are some foods which are dangerous, but not rarely are they deadly. Grapes and raisins are poisonous to dogs and can damage their kidneys, but scientists aren’t sure what chemical in the grapes and raisins actually affect dogs. What’s more unusual is that not all dogs appear to be affected by the toxin. Then there is caffeine, this can be found in large doses in coffee beans and other stimulants. You might need your morning coffee, but dogs can accidently ingest caffeine if these products are left within reach. Please be careful when throwing your coffee grounds in the trash.

Dr. Lee also points out some foods and substances which are extremely poisonous and you should keep your dog far away them. Bread dough is one of them because it contains unrisen yeast. There are a couple of concerns for a dog that has eaten bread dough. First of all, there is a large mass of dough in the stomach that is continuing to rise. Plus, the warm environment of the stomach promotes ongoing fermentation of the alcohol in the dough, which can result in ethanol toxicosis. Chocolate is horrible for your pets as it has high amounts of theobromine which is extremely toxic to dogs. Xylitol is poisonous as well and can be found in chewing gum, mints, toothpaste, nasal spray, and over-the-counter medications. Xylitol is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, which causes a release of insulin from the pancreas. This release of insulin results in a rapid decrease in the level of blood sugar. If untreated, these conditions can be life-threatening.

chocolate-toxicity-chart-pets

We love macadamia nuts around here, but make sure your dog steers clear of them. They are 80% oil and the high fat content can inflame your dog’s pancreas. There is also an unknown toxin in the nuts which can affect your dog’s brain waves and muscles. Last but certainly not least, is mold. Mold can be dangerous to everybody, including your dog. The most common sources of toxic mold are found in pasta, nuts and cheese.

In order to make sure your pooch lives a long and healthy life, please keep these things out of reach and spread this important message to dog owners all over the world.

Dog Park Design Considerations: Large & Small Dog Areas

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

Great Dane
As dog parks continue to grow in popularity, the debate on whether or not the dog park design should separate the little guys from large dogs has started to gain a lot of attention, so we’d put in our two paws, err, cents worth. Here at Dog-ON-It Parks, we have designed and outfitted dog parks in all shapes and sizes. Our verdict? Space permitting, we feel it’s safer all around to have separate large and small dog areas.

The separation helps ensure that both the dogs and their owners are able to enjoy their time at the park and also provides an opportunity to meet the needs of all park users, regardless of the size of their pets. This alleviates the need to have requested time slots for big or small dog play time and can also help to maintain the peace, so to speak. An important consideration in establishing separate areas is also providing clear communication in regards to the size restrictions for each area. Posting dog park rules and signs like these is an easy and affordable way to help make sure everyone is on the same page.

dog park car

The magic words “Go for ride?” are sure to excite any pooch, especially if they know where they’re going and sometimes that excitement may be too much for a dog new to the park, or just a dog that is a little less confident. And when you add size to the equation? It’s even more challenging.

Large and small dogs often have different play styles and different breeds have distinct (and often humorous!) personality traits which can factor in as well. Even unintentionally, big dogs can end up injuring a smaller pup because they just aren’t aware that there’s a little guy running around with them. Also, if a scuffle does happen to break out, having a more even playing field from the get go can possibly save a dog’s life.

This concept is also ideal for shy or timid dogs. The smaller area is often calmer and less overwhelming than the larger area would be with four big dogs hurtling towards you and your pooch to greet you. Starting out in the small and/or shy dog area of the park is a great way to introduce your pup to the dog park in a more neutral environment, so they can have a positive experience.

Sometimes due to space or budget considerations, it isn’t feasible to separate the pack so here are some suggestions to promote a safe and fun environment for everyone:

1. Always supervise your dog.
2. Make sure your pooch has a strong recall. Practice makes perfect, and if your dog is less than enthusiastic about coming when called, work on this skill at home with some high value treats. Pretty soon, you calling their name will equal “On my way!” instead of “Nope – I’d rather play!”
3. This is a biggie. Please, please make sure that your dog is properly socialized before visiting your local dog park. You are responsible for your pet’s success and safety. Not sure if your dog is ready? Try visiting the park during off hours where there aren’t as many dogs present to see if it’s a good fit.
4. Know the park rules before you go. Many dog parks don’t allow small children, food, puppies and dogs in heat, among other local rules that may vary from city to city.
5. Have fun!

mainstream

Interested in more dog park design tips and expert advice? Sign up for our newsletter, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. Woof!

Pet Parking 101

Monday, January 19th, 2015

Pet Parking Post with Wolfhound

Have you ever seen someone tying their dog up to all varieties of objects such newspaper dispensers, chairs or café tables? Often times, these aren’t exactly the safest way to secure your pet (if you’ve seen Marley & Me, you’ll know why!)…especially when they’re not meant to hold a 70 pound dog who just spotted the cutest little squirrel across the street that they just have to play with – right this second.

One of our favorite solutions at Dog-On-It-Parks is our Pet Parking Post, specifically designed to give you an extra hand while you juggle your coffee, sweatshirt, ball thrower, bag or just a wily canine.

The vibrant colors and laser cut paw print offer a fun pop of color and the two hitching arms accommodate both standard and retractable leashes. Even better? It’s manufactured with heavy gauge (and rust resistant!) aluminum that is secured with concrete so you can feel confident knowing your pooch won’t pull it over if that pesky squirrel happens to run by again.

Our Pet Parking Post is compact and can be easily installed almost anywhere. It’s perfect for tying up your pet while you make a quick run inside the grocery or pet store, community center, property management office or even at the bank.

From being a cute talking point that people notice on their way into your business or dog park, installing Pet Parking Posts throughout your community helps to create an environment where everyone is welcome, either with two or four legs.


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